columns

nico nuzzaci

I'm a maker and shaper of interactive experiences and services. I take photographs. I play music. I frequently run. I appreciate fashion. I like to travel. I admire simplicity and quality.

17th Dec '14

My 2014 running campaign started with a new and exciting approach: a heart rate monitor, a low-glycemic diet and a running pace dictated by whatever 155 heartbeats per minute gave me.

After 4 months my Garmin racing predictions were scary and my weight was the lowest it’s ever been. I felt great.

IMG_4565
These race predictions from my Garmin 620

To evaluate my new approach I had registered for a lab session in February and then two races in May: a half marathon to experience my lactate/anaerobic threshold, followed by Stockholm Marathon three weeks later to see how I performed over the longer distance.

The summer was scheduled for speed development and the overall goal for all of this was to do a sub 3:15 at Berlin Marathon in September.

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset
Photo taken during the lab session… In hindsight, I think it’s fair to say that casting Tom Hardy as Bane in Dark Knight Rises was a mistake.

Being in the lab was good fun. I did two tests: one to determine my lactate threshold (increase effort over time while taking blood samples) and one being a so called “max” test (which means running until you fall of the belt).

On the 29th of April I did an easy 33km jog on 2:37:34. Average pace 4:46/km with an average heart rate at only 146 bpm. It wasn’t a flat course either. Elevation 329 meter.

This was without preparation (such as carbohydrate loading, glycogen-depleting and tapered training), without race adrenaline and in the morning on an empty stomach.

At that point in time, a sub 3:15 wasn’t unrealistic, and with 4 month left to Berlin Marathon I starting to think that I should target a ‘just above 3:10′ instead of a ‘just under 3:15′.

I was in my best ever form. Every part of my mind and body was with me… besides my achilles tendon… she decided to give in just a few days after that peak and just a few days before I was about to run the first race.

I aborted the half marathon half way. I felt strong but I wasn’t able to run on the intended pace (4:10) without my achilles saying no.

The marathon I aborted on km 29.

Bummer.

Most of the summer ended up being rehabilitation instead of speed work. I only ran 109km in May, 47km in June and 112 in July. Nothing like the levels pre-injury [below].

IMG_4512

I increased the training again in August and September but without have had a longer stretch of continuity I reached the Berlin Marathon starting line with very low expectations.

My race strategy was to keep a pace of 4:44/km, but not letting my heart rate surpass 155 bpm until the later stages of the race. So no faster than 4:44/km or 155 bpm. A 4:44/km pace would give me some margins to be able to lose a few minutes at the end of the race and still shave of a minute or two from my 3:27 PB.

Someone told me a few years ago that the first 30k in a marathon is just transportation to the real race. It’s so true. It’s only when you reach kilometre 30 you know if you’re having a good day or not.

When I passed the 30k mark I was still in extremely good shape. So good that I was overthrown with deep emotions. Tears were not far off. I almost felt like stopping. The ‘I made it!’ sensation was that strong. This was my 4th marathon and I had never felt this good at this point in the race.

A few km later I had to start digging, which slowly crescendoed into 3 – 4 less glamorous kilometers at the end. Having to fight for just 15 – 20 minutes in a marathon is a blessing.

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That’s me pushing for the finish.

I passed the finish line on 3:22:48. For a couple of minutes I really couldn’t understand what just had happened. I was so convinced that I would have a horrible race, but instead I had a lovely one executed perfectly — just on the edge of what my body and mind could deliver on the day.

I had been very even. My 5k splits were: 23:59, 24:06, 23:46, 23:56, 23:55, 24:06, 23:59, 24:31.

First half was done in 1:40:57 and second in 1:41:51.

My average pace was 4:48… that’s maybe my only disappointment. According to my GPS watch i kept 4:44/km as intended.

But all of this belongs to the past.

No rest for the wicked.

For 2015 I’ve decided to have my yearly marathon penciled in early to be able to shift my focus onto the half marathon distance. This means I now need to keep up with marathon preperations throughout the harsh, cold, dark Swedish winter. Thankfully a sunny LA Marathon awaits me in March.

The fact that next years marathon preparations sneaked in on this side of the new year has resulted into a new PB for total kilometers in a year. This came as a surprise. In 2012 I ran 2012km. I remembered it being… a big undertaking. This year I just happened to beat it and I’ve been injured.

strava Screen grab from Strava

So far this year I’m up to 2001. So just one run away from breaking it. I will probably end the year on something closer to 2100.

However, I have to add, most km covered in 11 month still belongs to 2012, which actually also is 2012km.

17th Dec '14
12th Dec '14
Preface: I wrote below piece for Hyper Island. The original is located on hyperisland.com/community/news/leap-of-faith…. This is simply a re-publish of the same article.

detail_Leap_of_Faith

For the most part of my vocation as a Designer — a maker and shaper of digital services and experiences — I’ve been given the advice to specialise; to clarify my role and what I offer.

In hindsight, it’s easy to see that this advice wasn’t directed to me as an individual and for the well-being of my career. It was a favour, disguised as a suggestion so that less friction would be involved when trying to pigeon-hole me into the traditional invoice cycles and the conveyor-belt like approach applied by the industry to deliver billable results to clients.

I’m stubborn. I’m quality driven. I’m also a maker. So, these attempts were futile.

Somewhere along the way this industrial approach began to burst at the seams; businesses started to ask for more flexibility, firms started to question the quality of work that got shipped. You could say that our customers’ expectations got higher, and our traditional methods didn’t deliver.

It became more and more evident that what had worked really well for advertising and traditional design firms wasn’t applicable 1-to-1 when the medium was digital; Where a customer interacts and participates with the result. Where the delivery is something that lives on. When what you create is an experience for many more senses in many more scenarios and situations.

Along with this maturity, the… “advice” to specialise got replaced with curiosity on my thoughts on how to execute a project with fewer handoffs and more collaboration. Invigorating.

We are still very much in this maze. A growing scale of brave firms and hero clients are in the forefront to find a healthy and sustainable balance between control, fear, competence, experience, ownership, authority, innovation, guarantees, speed, flexibility etc and so on.

Thankfully, help is on the way.

leap-1 The entrance to Hyper Island in Manchester

Initiating change

In 2011, Hyper Island was about to run a 32-week pilot for a Digital Media Management program in Manchester together with Teesside University. It was designed to prepare students for a leading role in the media, creative, and digital industries.

Due to various reasons (mainly a lot to cover over a short period), the ambition was to merge the learning outcomes for design and technology into the same module.

Given my involvement, knowledge and insight into the Hyper Island methodology, in combination with my multifaceted interest with design and technology, I was asked to interpret the learning outcomes and design a learning experience which I also would facilitate.

I was given a lot of trust and a very long leash, which I gladly accepted.

A unique and almost unreal opportunity: What type of co-workers would I like to have in the future? What type of designers would I like to design?

Today, the perspective I get when writing this is giving me a sense of acrophobia, but back then it was more a matter of hitting the ground running.

The result became a module titled ‘Creative Problem Solving’. A learning experience to give the students an understanding on how to get insights into how people interact with digital products and services, their needs and experiences, and how to design them to be both effective and intuitive.

The learning was based on the methodology commonly referred to as Design Thinking, the basis being: define the problem, research for a solution, ideate with others to come up with the best options, create prototypes, choose the best solution, roll it out and learn from its success.

leap-3 Riccardo Rotesi (right), DMM student 2013, presenting ideas to Simon Waterfall (left), the Vice President and Creative Director at OnCue, over Skype.

I’m extremely proud that my interpretation of the module caught the imagination of the director and program managers at Hyper Island and lead them to researched this further and ultimately launch an entirely new program, titled Digital Experience Design.

It’s unfortunate that the very type of designer the industry tried to suffocate, is today the type that is very much sought after. The type they promoted, are today abandoned. I liked to believe that the very purpose of agencies were to accumulate and curate talent, not eliminate.

Given my personal experience and reflection on my career to date, it’s clear that talent curation and direction of an industry still need actors such as Hyper Island to inject oxygen into the ongoing change and evolution.

Now let’s embrace and welcome these multifaceted t-shaped designers with open arms and active ears. Let’s give them space and trust to fuel the change. Like with all great endeavours: let’s give it a leap of faith.

12th Dec '14
27th Nov '14

article-carrey2-0526

I hadn’t heard about Maharishi University before I got recommended to watched Jim Carrey’s commencement address (speech).

Not only is his speech very inspiring and sound, reading about the University was one of those… “does this really exist?” moments.

It says on their landing page:

Yes, there are many reasons why it’s not totally fair that some students get to go to MUM and some don’t.

… and it definitely feels unfair.

Jim Carrey’s speech is very inspiring. He says things that really resonates with me. I however would have wished that he kept it a tad more serious. But… I mean… it’s Jim.

Read the transcript or/and watch the video on www.mum.edu/whats-happening/...

Below are my highlights from the transcript:

I am here to plant a seed that will inspire you to move forward in life with enthusiastic hearts and a clear sense of wholeness. The question is, will that seed have a chance to take root, […]

Life doesn’t happen to you, it happens for you. How do I know this? I don’t, but I’m making sound, and that’s the important thing. That’s what I’m here to do. Sometimes, I think that’s one of the only things that are important. Just letting each other know we’re here, reminding each other that we are part of a larger self. I used to think Jim Carrey is all that I was…

[…]

[…]

I used to believe that who I was ended at the edge of my skin, that I had been given this little vehicle called a body from which to experience creation, […]. Then, I learned that everything outside the vehicle was a part of me, too, and now I drive a convertible. […]

[…]

[…] It does allow you to separate who you truly are and what’s real, from the stories that run through your head. You have given them the ability to walk behind the mind’s elaborate set decoration, and to see that there is a huge difference between a dog that is going to eat you in your mind and an actual dog that’s going to eat you. (laughter) That may sound like no big deal, but many never learn that distinction and spend a great deal of their lives living in fight or flight response.

[…] I have a saying, “Beware the unloved,” because they will eventually hurt themselves…[…]

[…] No doubt some of you will turn out to be crooks! But white-collar stuff — Wall St. ya’ know, that type of thing — crimes committed by people with self-esteem! Stuff a parent can still be proud of in a weird way.

[…]

[…] Sure it’s rough sometimes but that’s OK, ‘cause they’ve got soft serve ice cream with sprinkles! (laughter) I guess that’s what I’m really here to say; sometimes it’s okay to eat your feelings! (laughter)

Fear is going to be a player in your life, but you get to decide how much. You can spend your whole life imagining ghosts, worrying about your pathway to the future, but all there will ever be is what’s happening here, and the decisions we make in this moment, which are based in either love or fear.

So many of us choose our path out of fear disguised as practicality. What we really want seems impossibly out of reach and ridiculous to expect, so we never dare to ask the universe for it. I’m saying, I’m the proof that you can ask the universe for it […]

[…]

I learned many great lessons from my father, not the least of which was that you can fail at what you don’t want, so you might as well take a chance on doing what you love.

[…]

[…]

[…]

[…] I can tell you from experience, the effect you have on others is the most valuable currency there is.

Everything you gain in life will rot and fall apart, and all that will be left of you is what was in your heart. […] I am at the top of the mountain and the only one I hadn’t freed was myself and that’s when my search for identity deepened.

[…]

[…] that peace that we’re after, lies somewhere beyond personality, beyond the perception of others, beyond invention and disguise, even beyond effort itself. You can join the game, fight the wars, play with form all you want, but to find real peace, you have to let the armor fall. Your need for acceptance can make you invisible in this world. Don’t let anything stand in the way of the light that shines through this form. Risk being seen in all of your glory.

[…] This painting is called “High Visibility.” (laughter) It’s about picking up the light and daring to be seen. Here’s the tricky part. Everyone is attracted to the light. The party host up in the corner (refers to painting) who thinks unconsciousness is bliss and is always offering a drink from the bottles that empty you; Misery, below her, who despises the light — can’t stand when you’re doing well — and wishes you nothing but the worst; The Queen of Diamonds who needs a King to build her house of cards; And the Hollow One, who clings to your leg and begs, “Please don’t leave me behind for I have abandoned myself.”

Even those who are closest to you and most in love with you; the people you love most in the world can find clarity confronting at times. […]

[…] Painting is one of the ways I free myself from concern, a way to stop the world through total mental, spiritual and physical involvement.

But even with that, comes a feeling of divine dissatisfaction. Because ultimately, we’re not the avatars we create. We’re not the pictures on the film stock. We are the light that shines through it. All else is just smoke and mirrors. Distracting, but not truly compelling.

I’ve often said that I wished people could realize all their dreams of wealth and fame so they could see that it’s not where you’ll find your sense of completion. Like many of you, I was concerned about going out in the world and doing something bigger than myself, until someone smarter than myself made me realize that there is nothing bigger than myself!

My soul is not contained within the limits of my body. My body is contained within the limitlessness of my soul — one unified field of nothing dancing for no particular reason, except maybe to comfort and entertain itself. (applause) As that shift happens in you, you won’t be feeling the world you’ll be felt by it — you will be embraced by it. Now, I’m always at the beginning. I have a reset button called presence and I ride that button constantly.

Once that button is functional in your life, there’s no story the mind could create that will be as compelling. The imagination is always manufacturing scenarios — both good and bad — and the ego tries to keep you trapped in the multiplex of the mind. Our eyes are not only viewers, but also projectors that are running a second story over the picture we see in front of us all the time. Fear is writing that script and the working title is, ‘I’ll never be enough.’

[…]

[…] the voice of your ego. If you listen to it, there will always be someone who seems to be doing better than you. No matter what you gain, ego will not let you rest. It will tell you that you cannot stop until you’ve left an indelible mark on the earth, until you’ve achieved immortality. How tricky is the ego that it would tempt us with the promise of something we already possess.

[…]

[…] as far as I can tell, it’s just about letting the universe know what you want and working toward it while letting go of how it might come to pass.
Your job is not to figure out how it’s going to happen for you, but to open the door in your head and when the doors open in real life, just walk through it. Don’t worry if you miss your cue. There will always be another door opening. They keep opening.

[…]

Oh, and why not take a chance on faith as well? Take a chance on faith — not religion, but faith. Not hope, but faith. […] Hope walks through the fire. Faith leaps over it.

[…] you will only ever have two choices: love or fear. Choose love, and don’t ever let fear turn you against your playful heart.

[…]

27th Nov '14
11th Nov '14

It’s not that I’m a luddite and don’t like technology; I’ve just never been interested. When I moved to Los Angeles in 1997, nobody really had cell phones, and I just never went down that path.

Apparently, Christopher Nolan does not have a cell phone or an email account. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christ...

11th Nov '14
6th Nov '14

The word “design” makes people think of visual arrangement and appearance. “Topology” is a decent word for the underlying scheme. A “design” in the topological sense is a set of elements connected in a specific way. The style and visual presentation are layered on top. Software systems, below the visual “design”, are topologies of affordances. Networks of buttons, fields and outputs connected by functions.

@rjs

6th Nov '14
4th Nov '14

01_Comp (2)

As @BenedictEvans puts it:

Google is reworking Mail and Calendar from database displays to task-led interfaces. I wonder how far they’ll take that.

Really interesting and really fun to see. You might wonder what took them so long…

Source:

daringfireball.net/2014/11/g...

More:

www.google.com/landing/calen...

www.gmail.com/app

gmailblog.blogspot.se/2014/1...

gmailblog.blogspot.se/2014/1...

4th Nov '14
20th Oct '14

If you believe that the solution to a particular problem is to increase the amount of something, be aware that it might just happens to be that the thing you want more of, is the actual problem.

20th Oct '14
20th Oct '14

I tried to look at where did the kind of learning we do in schools, where did it come from? […] It came from about 300 years ago, and it came from the last and the biggest of the empires on this planet. The British Empire. […] What they did was amazing. They created a global computer made up of people. It’s still with us today. It’s called the bureaucratic administrative machine. In order to have that machine running, you need lots and lots of people. They made another machine to produce those people: the school. […] They engineered a system that was so robust that it’s still with us today, continuously producing identical people for a machine that no longer exists. […] We take our children, we make them shut their brains down, and then we say, “Perform.” […] We don’t want to be spare parts for a great human computer, do we? So we need to design a future for learning.

Sugata Mitra

on.ted.com/TEDPrize2013

20th Oct '14
17th Oct '14

Self-respect yields honesty, honesty allows directness, directness produces integrity, and integrity suggests grace. I’ve always longed for grace in my day to day—to elegantly jump from obligation to obligation and juggle it all with assurance and skill. […] most grace is surface, and under the skin lives a barely concealed chaos.

[…] Continually attempting to manage too much isn’t the mark of grace, it’s the sign of a dumbass. It’s best to identify and do what you’re required and able, then jettison the rest.

I made a small note: remember your reasons, so your noes mean no and your yeses mean yes. If yes, understand the cost, accept it, and go forth. This is the antidote to the whiplash of modern life, to automatic and unchecked desire, to the anxiety created by spinelessness. A person must know what’s enough, and stand beside the choice.

frankchimero.com/blog/jettis...

17th Oct '14
17th Oct '14

It is the phenomenon sometimes called “alienation from self.” In its advanced stages, we no longer answer the telephone, because someone might want something […] Every encounter demands too much, tears the nerves, drains the will, and the specter of something as small as an unanswered letter arouses such disproportionate guilt that answering it becomes out of the question. […] to free us from the expectations of others, to give us back to ourselves—there lies the great, the singular power of self-respect.

– Joan Didion

17th Oct '14
16th Oct '14

The problem with all these micro-phone-checks is that they were never long enough to really process anything mentally. […] It was such a refreshing and strange feeling to just look around and soak in the environment. I noticed a huge amount of detail I would’ve never seen previously.

ryancarson.com/post/99922882...

16th Oct '14
15th Oct '14

2014-10-13-virgin-america-boarding-pass

I just checked in online for a flight to California tomorrow on Virgin America, and was pleasantly surprised by how cleverly their boarding pass is designed. […] it acknowledges that these documents almost always get folded up for convenience.

Via www.subtraction.com/2014/10/...

15th Oct '14
15th Oct '14

Graydon+Carter+Jonathan+Ive+Vanity+Fair+New+ddYNS3Pt3Zsl

This sounds really simplistic but it still shocks me how few people actually practice this. […] it’s this issue of focus.

Graydon Carter (at Vanity Fair’s New Establishment Summit) askes Jonathan Ive about three life lessons learned from Steve Jobs. As so many other times: they are obvious, powerful and simple; yet so very difficult and hard.

http://youtu.be/2oksetv3i90

15th Oct '14
14th Oct '14
14th Oct '14
9th Oct '14

if you aim to create a revolution, you must be willing to part with the existing preconceptions that are holding your competitors back. Only then will you be able to take a meaningful leap forward. That will surely attract some criticism in the beginning, but once the product manages to stand on its own, people will see it for what it really is.

The tech world is largely governed by that rule. It’s what we now call disruption.

www.analogsenses.com/2014/10...

9th Oct '14
9th Oct '14

1*8OA4Zlc3wUVTuOTWENiAow

I like words a lot. But sometimes a few sketches communicate a point more simply and memorably.

Julie Zhuo sketches illustrating the different between junior and senior designers are funny.

https://medium.com/the-year-of…

9th Oct '14
9th Oct '14

You know, one of the things that really hurt Apple was after I left John Sculley got a very serious disease. It’s the disease of thinking that a really great idea is 90% of the work. And if you just tell all these other people “here’s this great idea,” then of course they can go off and make it happen.

And the problem with that is that there’s just a tremendous amount of craftsmanship in between a great idea and a great product. And as you evolve that great idea, it changes and grows. It never comes out like it starts because you learn a lot more as you get into the subtleties of it. And you also find there are tremendous tradeoffs that you have to make. There are just certain things you can’t make electrons do. There are certain things you can’t make plastic do. Or glass do. Or factories do. Or robots do.

Designing a product is keeping five thousand things in your brain and fitting them all together in new and different ways to get what you want. And every day you discover something new that is a new problem or a new opportunity to fit these things together a little differently.

And it’s that process that is the magic.

And so we had a lot of great ideas when we started [the Mac]. But what I’ve always felt that a team of people doing something they really believe in is like is like when I was a young kid there was a widowed man that lived up the street. He was in his eighties. He was a little scary looking. And I got to know him a little bit. I think he may have paid me to mow his lawn or something.

And one day he said to me, “come on into my garage I want to show you something.” And he pulled out this dusty old rock tumbler. It was a motor and a coffee can and a little band between them. And he said, “come on with me.” We went out into the back and we got just some rocks. Some regular old ugly rocks. And we put them in the can with a little bit of liquid and little bit of grit powder, and we closed the can up and he turned this motor on and he said, “come back tomorrow.”
And this can was making a racket as the stones went around.

And I came back the next day, and we opened the can. And we took out these amazingly beautiful polished rocks. The same common stones that had gone in, through rubbing against each other like this (clapping his hands), creating a little bit of friction, creating a little bit of noise, had come out these beautiful polished rocks.

That’s always been in my mind my metaphor for a team working really hard on something they’re passionate about. It’s that through the team, through that group of incredibly talented people bumping up against each other, having arguments, having fights sometimes, making some noise, and working together they polish each other and they polish the ideas, and what comes out are these really beautiful stones.

Steve Jobs

9th Oct '14
9th Oct '14

You don’t get to decide the truth. Other people have their own experiences, just as valid. This is easy to forget. Your slice of life seems so large and unmistakeable, like a mirage of wholeness from where you stand. But it is your job to know better and not confuse your small piece for the whole, even if you sometimes forget. Life is big—much bigger than just yours.

Frank Chimero

9th Oct '14
9th Oct '14

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This solo acoustic performance by Dave Grohl of the songs ‘Walk’ and ‘The Pretender’ is… inspiring. Not many artists can pull this much energy and intensity into an acoustic performance.
http://youtu.be/TPd7Pd-jiO4

9th Oct '14
8th Oct '14

Great stories happen to those who can tell them

– Ira Glass

8th Oct '14
2nd Oct '14

PHOTO_20818728_75233_4385701_ap

I think that for a project or an adventure to be a real adventure it has to have some amount of uncertainty. If I know I will succeed from the start, it will be a mechanical venture. […] When you leave what you know, you are widening the reality you live in and thus widening your own consciousness. If we feel safe everyday, we aren’t really living; we’re only repeating what we know. Living, for me, is expanding ones own reality as far as possible.

– Andreas Frannson
via www.tetongravity.com/story/s...

2nd Oct '14
24th Sep '14

frank-chimero-the-shape-of-design-bookX-1140

The Shape of Design is a beautiful and insightful book written by Frank Chimero. Instead of talking about typography, grids, or logos, it focuses on storytelling, co-dependency, and craft. Not only is it a must read: the digital version is available for free on read.shapeofdesignbook.com.

24th Sep '14
24th Sep '14

A book with proper margins says, We respect you, Dear Reader, and also you, Dear Author, and you, too, Dear Book.

View story at Medium.com

24th Sep '14
24th Sep '14

smv1

Back in februari 2013, I posted a note stating that the work of Simon Massey di Vallazza spoke to me. Eventually i ordered a painting from Simon. I’m super pleased with it.

24th Sep '14
18th Sep '14

When in doubt: do (and start anywhere).

18th Sep '14
18th Sep '14

1*gT4SXCFOCROlxhMpQkgumQ

In Japanese culture, there is a word for this: chindogu. The literal translation is “weird tool,” but the concept is about utility, or lack thereof. Kenji Kawakami coined the term as a way to point out objects that are invented under the premise of solving a problem, but which, in practice, only generate more problems, rendering them devoid of utility. Kawakami humorously calls them “unuseless,” which is to say, they have a function, it’s just not one that helps us (and it may be one that harms us).

When creating and refining digital services; chindogu is a daily challenge. A method I found that can help to prevent this is to keep asking the question: yeah, but why?

The quote is pulled from the article ‘Yes We Can. But Should We?':

View story at Medium.com

18th Sep '14
18th Sep '14

We believe it’s critical for our users to know about when and how governments ask us for their information. That’s why we’ve released information about the number of requests we receive for user information and how we respond to them on an annual basis since 2012.

Dropbox is raising the stakes and setting a new standard:

www.dropbox.com/transparency

18th Sep '14
18th Sep '14
18th Sep '14
16th Sep '14

Q: Pretend that you’re trapped in a magical room with only two exits. Through the first exit is a room made from a giant magnifying glass, and the blazing hot sun will fry you to death. Through the second door is a room with a fire-breathing dragon. Which do you go through?

A: The first door, of course. Simply wait until the sun goes down.

The above riddle/puzzle is grabbed from the article ‘How to Apply Lateral Thinking to Your Creative Work’ found here:

99u.com/articles/31987/how-t...

From my persecutive, the thinking processes used when “doing” lateral thinking, is more powerful when applied to life and life decisions in general, and not merely while doing creative work. In life, and how we “should” live it, we carry many many assumptions.

16th Sep '14
12th Sep '14

Few days ago, Apple introduced iPhone 6 Plus. The new iPhone substantially changes the way graphics are rendered on screen. We’ve made an infographic to demystify this.

paintcodeapp.com/news/iphone...

12th Sep '14
12th Sep '14

Empathy is more than a matter of trying to imagine what others are going through… Empathy is having the will to muster enought courage to do something about it.

@CornelWest

12th Sep '14
10th Sep '14

1024px-Suprematist_Composition_-_Kazimir_Malevich

bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0261bwl is a brilliant 8 minute long video clip where Peter Saville follows the dots from Kazimir Malevich via Dieter Rams to Jonathan Ive. Love it.

10th Sep '14
5th Sep '14

There’s a peculiar property of much criminality in the real world: You notice. A burgled home is missing things, an assaulted body hurts. These crimes still occur, but we can start responding to them immediately. If there’s one thing to take away from this compromise, it’s that when it comes to information theft you might find out quickly, or you may never find out at all.

dankaminsky.com/2014/09/03/n...

5th Sep '14
1st Sep '14

1280px-Disruptivetechnology

For the last couple of hours I’ve been watching a couple of presentations by Clay Christensen, the man who coined the term and theory called disruptive innovation.

I found most of his presentations, such as http://youtu.be/rpkoCZ4vBSI and http://youtu.be/Ei57yFEljrI, extremely insightful. As a designer who believing in sustainability: this is invigorating wisdom.

However, it was the talk – where he takes the theories outside the realm of business and goes on to apply them to the lessons of life – that really strikes a chord:

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clay Christensen at TEDxBoston http://youtu.be/tvos4nORf_Y.

1st Sep '14
31st Aug '14

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Robert Hodgin final talk of Eyeo Festival 2014 is both funny and interesting. Well worth a watch. http://vimeo.com/103537259

The Eyeo Festival is, with their words: ‘assembles an incredible set of creative coders, data designers and artists, and attendees — expect enthralling talks, unique workshops and interactions with open source instigators and super fascinating practitioners.

31st Aug '14
31st Aug '14

Over the last couple of weeks, the “idea” that machines will ‘take all our jobs’ have bubbled up in all kinds of media. This little video http://youtu.be/7Pq-S557XQU aim to fuel that notion.

I did find the above video entertaining, but I just can’t see that the problem lies in jobs or automation. Robots we can regulate. Isn’t the problem about consumption, capitalism, growth and natural resources? We can’t just expect humans to consume in the same pace as machines can produce.

31st Aug '14
31st Aug '14

The line between editorial content and advertising in news media is blurrier and blurrier. That’s not bullshit. It’s repurposed bovine waste.

John Oliver little rant on Native Advertising is sharp and funny: http://youtu.be/E_F5GxCwizc

31st Aug '14
31st Aug '14
31st Aug '14
31st Aug '14

Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 17.54.32

This video http://youtu.be/NNsI9fihzm8 is very funny. I’m sure most of you can recognise the stereotypes. It’s made by blog.alexcornell.com/why-its... via kottke.org/14/08/making-plan...

31st Aug '14
31st Aug '14

FAR13_05

For the last nine year Nicholas Felton has releases an personal annual report covering all sorts of activity and data. This years report (2013) examines, to quote: a year of Nicholas Felton’s communication data. It aspires to uncover patterns and insights within the data and metadata of a large and personal data set. Sources include conversations, SMS, telephone calls, email, Facebook messages and physical mail.

I find this topic (and numbers) very interesting.

The last couple of years I have personally taken proactive actions to “retreat” somewhat from social media, networking and all the constant updating and catching up with events of others. Addicts of communication. It has become a somewhat sprititual journey. Anyway, looking at this report – and the sheer mass of data – I can’t stop to think “this is insane”. And by that I don’t mean Nicholas in particular (and definitely not his work, just simply what his report implies.

feltron.com

31st Aug '14
30th Aug '14

forest-2

Molai forest is being named after Jadav “Molai” Payeng, Indian environmental activist and forestry worker. The forest was single-handedly planted by Payeng in a timespan of 30 years and encompasses an area of about 1,360 acres / 550 hectares.

Here’s a short documentary about this legend:
http://youtu.be/HkZDSqyE1do

30th Aug '14
30th Aug '14

Last night my mate asked to use a USB port to charge his cigarette, but I was using it to charge my book.

The future is stupid.

Via @garwboy

30th Aug '14
30th Aug '14

I just stumbled over this really interesting article on Claudia Kotchka: www.fastcompany.com/53060/in...

To me, it illustrates what design is and can be to businesses. It’s also really nice to read about some other real-world-examples on what design can do, and be, besides Apple.

More on this heroine:
ideo.com/people/claudia-kotchka
vimeo.com/5203345

30th Aug '14
30th Aug '14

When people are afraid to fail, tell them that they’re just making a ‘prototype.’

– Claudia Kotchka

30th Aug '14
29th Aug '14

Apps-as-Architecture

In spring of 2009, I graduated from architecture school […] I fell in love with the industry and 5 years later, I’m now a Product Designer at Percolate in NYC.

Nice to read about existing concepts but with fresh terms and new metaphors. blog.percolate.com/2014/08/a...

29th Aug '14
26th Aug '14

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A great little write-up on the new Yosemite icons: martiancraft.com/blog/2014/0...

26th Aug '14
25th Aug '14

PORTFOLIO ITALIA - ITALY PORTFOLIO

That was “Leica Photography.” It wasn’t about sharpness or resolution, or aspherical elements, or creamy bokeh or chromatic aberation or back focus or all the other nonsense we feel necessary to value when we fail to acknowledge the poverty of our vision.

leicaphilia.com/leica-photog...

25th Aug '14
24th Aug '14

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Researchers have developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a flat, clear surface.

www.sciencedaily.com/release...

24th Aug '14
24th Aug '14

Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible.

– Frank Zappa

24th Aug '14
23rd Aug '14

How could someone’s happiness increase when all the material sources of pleasure and distraction had been removed? At that age, the nature of my own mind did not interest me—only my life did. And I was utterly oblivious to how different life would be if the quality of my mind were to change. […]

Every relationship is as good or as bad as it is because of the minds involved. If you are perpetually angry, depressed, confused, and unloving, or your attention is elsewhere, it won’t matter how successful you become or who is in your life—you won’t enjoy any of it. […]

I was no longer anxious, self-critical, guarded by irony, in competition, avoiding embarrassment, ruminating about the past and future, or making any other gesture of thought or attention that separated me from him. I was no longer watching myself through another person’s eyes.

www.samharris.org/blog/item/...

23rd Aug '14
23rd Aug '14

Textbooks are expensive for the same reason enterprise software is bad: purchasing decisions are not made by the users.

@paulg

23rd Aug '14
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