13th Jun '15

It’s a sad way of looking at it, but it does ring true. Makes (horrible) sense, too: if you don’t have what’s required to improve, lower the base line. Cut from the bottom instead of adding to the top.

But the fee model comes with systematic costs that are not immediately obvious. Here’s the thing: in order for fees to work, there needs be something worth paying to avoid. That necessitates, at some level, a strategy that can be described as “calculated misery.” Basic service, without fees, must be sufficiently degraded in order to make people want to pay to escape it. And that’s where the suffering begins.

Bill McGee, […] summarized his findings this way: “The roomiest economy seats you can book on the nation’s four largest airlines are narrower than the tightest economy seats offered in the 1990s.”

www.newyorker.com/business/c...

13th Jun '15